Security

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A Virginia businessman who conned his victims out of more than a million dollars has been sentenced to prison. Glen Allen resident Gordon G. Miller III was the owner and operator of software engineering company G3 Systems and of purported venture capital company, G3i Ventures, LLC. From 2017, the 56-year-old began running multiple fraud schemes
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The owner of a martial arts academy in Florida is in custody after allegedly installing hidden cameras in the restroom to spy on students.  Police in Broward County arrested 64-year-old martial arts instructor Robert Danilo Franco on Friday. An investigation was launched after a 17-year-old female student spotted the devices and tipped off police. Investigators said the
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by Paul Ducklin [00’26”] Timezone curiosities – when modular arithmetic gets weird [04’38”] Microsoft researcher found Apple 0-day in March, didn’t report it [13’18”] Retro computing – the TRS-80 arrived in August 1977 [19’17”] BazarCaller – the crooks who talk you into infecting yourself [33’02”] Oh! No! A billionaire… but only for 5 minutes With
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by Paul Ducklin If you’re a regular reader of Naked Security and Sophos News, you’ll almost certainly be familiar with Cobalt Strike, a network attack tool that’s popular with cybercriminals and malware creators. For example, by implanting the Cobalt Strike “Beacon” software on a network they’ve infiltrated, ransomware crooks can not only surreptitiously monitor but
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The United States has been given leave to appeal a British court’s decision not to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Paul Assange to America.  In Westminster Magistrate’s court in January, district judge Vanessa Baraitser ruled that Australian citizen Assange should not be extradited to the United States to face 17 charges under the Espionage Act and one charge under the
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The Biden administration has announced the cancellation of a $10bn massive cloud-computing contract awarded to Microsoft.  After Microsoft won a lengthy bidding process for the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) cloud contract in 2019, competing contractor Amazon Web Services (AWS) complained that the decision wasn’t fair. Yesterday the DoD issued a statement declaring that the contract had passed its sell-by date
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The majority of insider data breaches are non-malicious, according to new research released today by American cybersecurity software company Code42 in partnership with Aberdeen Research.  The report Understanding Your Insider Risk and the Value of Your Intellectual Property found that at least one in three (33%) reported data breaches involve someone with authorized access to the impacted data. A key finding of the
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Cyber-scammers are exploiting public interest in the latest Marvel movie to spread malware infections.  The eagerly anticipated premiere of Disney’s Black Widow is scheduled to take place simultaneously offline in movie theaters and online via streaming services tomorrow. However, cyber-criminals have been illegally monetizing interest in the new flick for months, according to research by
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A new study has revealed that nearly all security professionals operating in a multi-cloud environment believe it’s riskier than relying on a single cloud provider. The research, published today by global security and compliance solutions provider Tripwire, is based on a June 2021 survey of 314 security professionals with direct responsibility for the security of public cloud
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Nearly two-thirds (36%) of IT leaders are not disclosing breaches for fear that they may lose their job, complicating efforts to enhance security, according to new research. Keeper Security polled 1000 UK IT decision-makers at businesses of between 100 and 5000 employees to compile its 2021 Cybersecurity Census Report. It revealed that security breaches are widespread: 92%
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by Paul Ducklin [01’08”] Apple’s emergency 0-day fix. [08’51”] A new sort of Windows nightmare, this one not involving printers. [20’39”] Another new sort of Windows nightmare, also with no printers. [27’37”] Twitter hacker busted. [34’50”] Oh! No! Our very own Doug ruins a brand new TV. With Doug Aamoth and Paul Ducklin. Intro and outro music by Edith Mudge.
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by Paul Ducklin You might be forgiven for thinking that July 2021 was Microsoft’s month for cybersecurity vulnerabilities. First there was PrintNightmare in several guises, followed by HiveNightmare (an entirely unrelated bug that nevertheless attracted the “Nightmare” moniker), followed by PetitPotam (which went down the cute aquatic mammal naming path). Now, however, it’s Apple’s turn
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by Paul Ducklin [00’38”] Learning from computer virus history.  [02’26”] The PrintNightmare saga continues.  [05’27”] Apple puts out a patch, but doesn’t say why.  [08’12”] Snitch on a crook and earn $10 million.  [17’50”] Scammars do grammer and speeling correctly.  [25’12”] And the Business Email Compromise that wasn’t. With Doug Aamoth and Paul Ducklin. Intro and outro music by Edith Mudge. LISTEN NOW Click-and-drag on the
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by Paul Ducklin As if one Windows Nightmare dogging all our printers were not enough… …here’s another bug, disclosed by Microsoft on 2021-07-20, that could expose critical secrets from the Windows registry. Denoted CVE-2021-36934, this one has variously been nicknamed HiveNightmare and SeriousSAM. The moniker HiveNightmare comes from the fact that Windows stores its registry
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by Paul Ducklin [01’32”] We explain how a format string bug could lock your iPhone out of your own network.  [08’53”] We revisit the PrintNightmare saga, which is sort-of fixed but not really.  [12’50”] We look back at the 20-year-old Code Red virus.  [18’30”] We look at what cybercriminals spend money on (hint: more cybercrime).  [29’10”] And in this week’s “Oh! No!”, we learn
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by Paul Ducklin Just over a week ago, we wrote about the REvil ransomware gang’s latest braggadoccio. As you probably know, ransomware operators like REvil, Clop and others don’t generally work on the front line themselves by conducting the actual network intrusions that deliver the final ransomware warhead. Instead, they recruit teams of “attack affiliates”